Below are some frequently asked questions about NFA PRO, our gun trusts, terms used in our trust builder questionnaire, and general questions about the National Firearms Act (or “NFA”). If your question isn’t answered here, please contact us.

An NFA trust (or “gun trust”) is a legal document specially designed to hold legal title to firearms regulated by the National Firearms Act of 1934 (the “NFA”). Items regulated by the NFA are often called “Class 3 firearms” or “NFA items”. NFA items include, among other items, silencers, short barreled rifles, short barreled shotguns, and machine guns. Our gun trusts also allow you to assign your interests in non-NFA firearms.

Our gun trusts are valid in every state. Please note, however, that NFA items aren’t legal in every state. It’s your responsibility to confirm the legality of the NFA items in your state.

Yes. They are comprehensive revocable trusts designed specifically for the purpose of holding title to NFA weapons.

Beyond paying for your NFA trust, there really aren’t any major disadvantages to using a gun trust to hold title to your NFA weapons other than your obligations to conduct reasonable due diligence before appointing other trustees to the trust and following the terms of the trust agreement.

No, NFA PRO is not a law firm. However, you may contact us about the possibility of working one on one with an NFA gun trust lawyer for an additional fee.

While there is no requirement that you do so, consultation with a qualified attorney who is licensed in your state is highly recommended.  The information provided on this website is not a substitute for appropriate legal advice in your state, nor are the materials we provide you with your trust.

If you purchase a trust from us, the name of your trust will automatically end with “Trust”.  Other than that, there are no rules for trust names.  Shorter is generally best, however, as you’ll need to engrave the name of the trust (in addition to your city and state) on any NFA items that your trust makes.  Many people use their last name or initials.  Although NFA gun trusts are perfectly legal, for your privacy and ease in dealing with financial institutions, you may also want to avoid using the following terms “NFA”, “Gun”, or “Firearm”. We have heard reports that some financial institutions have refused to open up trust bank accounts for nfa trusts.

There is no limit, per se. However, we recommend limiting trustees to very close friends and family members.

Yes you may. Of course, if they are going to possess your trust’s NFA items in their state, those NFA items must be legal there. If NFA items are being moved interstate, you will need ATF approval, which requires submission of ATF Form 5320.20. The exceptions to the rule are silencers and AOWs.

Only duly appointed trustees of your trust may lawfully possess NFA items held by your trust.  The successor trustee is not legally entitled to possess your trust’s NFA items unless and until all other acting trustees die or are unable or unwilling to serve, subject to any additional legal requirements in effect at that time.

  • Trust Agreement
  • Certification of Trust
  • Assignment Page
  • Form for Adding a Co-Trustee
  • Form for Removing a Co-Trustee
  • Form for Documenting Contributions of Money to a Trust Bank Account
  • Form for Documenting Contribution of $1 to the Trust
  • Written Statement of Responsible Person
  • Instructions for Executing Your Trust Agreement, Funding Your Trust and Submitting Applications to Register NFA items.

You can assign your interests in your Title I firearms to the trust.  It depends on your circumstances and your estate planning goals.  You should contact a qualified attorney in your state for guidance.

We offer you the option to select a multigenerational trust when you chose the terms of your trust. To create a multigenerational trust, select “my descendants” when choosing your trust’s beneficiaries.

Yes, you may.  But, your children will not be able to possess any NFA item until they are at least 18 years old and able to lawfully to possess a firearm.

As used in the trust formation questionnaire, the term “Beneficiary” means one or more natural persons (whether now living or as of yet unborn descendants) or one or more charitable organizations exempt from federal taxation under Section 501(c)(3) of the US Federal Income Tax Code.

The Beneficiary (or Beneficiaries) that you name in the trust will receive the property held by the trust (either the firearms and accessories themselves or the proceeds of the sale of the firearms), upon the termination of the trust.  The trust will terminate by the date that is required by the law of your state (generally, within 21 years past the death of someone named in the trust).  The trust can be terminated earlier in the discretion of the trustees.

A successor trustee is a person you name to step up and administer the trust should you and all other trustees die or become unable or unwilling to serve as trustees.  This person must be 18 or older and able to lawfully possess a firearm in your state.  The successor trustee is not legally entitled to possess your trust’s NFA items unless and until all other acting trustees die or are unable or unwilling to serve, subject to any additional legal requirements in effect at that time.

No.  Setting up a bank account in the name of your trust is entirely optional.  However, setting up a trust account does have the added benefit of “funding your trust”, which is a required step to forming your trust.  Setting up a trust account also gives you a segregated pool of funds titled in the name of your trust which you can use for trust related expenses, such as purchases of weapons and accessories, and paying for stamps.  Another method of funding your trust is assigning a one dollar bill to your trust. 

No. Our trusts use an assignment page which you use to assign your interest in firearms and accessories to the trust. With the exception of an assignment page for each NFA item you seek to register, your assignment pages do not need to be provided to the ATF.

Yes, our trusts may be used for an unlimited amount of firearms and accessories.

No, you do not give up any of your Fourth Amendment rights by virtue of being a settlor and/or a trustee of a gun trust or by lawfully acquiring NFA items.


In order to lawfully possess a NFA item you must be at least 18 years old and able to lawfully possess a firearm.  This means that if your state has a license requirement for possession of a particular type of firearm, then you must have such license(s) prior to taking possession of that type of firearm. Additionally, in order to lawfully possess an NFA item, that NFA item must be legal to possess in the state in which you are present.

All sales are FINAL.

We do, however guarantee that our trusts will be approved by the ATF if they are signed and notarized according to our instructions. If you incorrectly complete a Form 1 or Form 4 application, resulting in the rejection of your application, you will not be eligible for a refund.

If you make an error while drafting your trust on our site, please contact us as soon as possible and before signing any documents. Any errors caused by our system will be fixed free of charge. Customer errors may result in an additional $10 service charge.

For requests, please contact us using our contact form or send us an email at: info@nfapro.com

Our site is totally automated, so your documents will be delivered to you instantly after payment, without another set of eyes reviewing your documents. For that reason, you should take great care to confirm spellings, names, locations, and other relevant information. If you make an error while drafting your trust on our site, contact us as soon as possible and before signing any documents. Any errors caused by our system will be fixed free of charge. Customer errors may result in an additional $10 service charge.

For requests, please contact us using our contact form or send us an email at: info@nfapro.com

We guarantee that our trusts will be approved by the ATF if signed and notarized according to our instructions. If you incorrectly complete a Form 1 or Form 4 application, resulting in the rejection of your application, you will not be eligible for a refund. For more information, please contact us using our contact form or send us an email at: info@nfapro.com

Yes, if you send us a request we can provide a redacted sample gun trust that will give you a good sense of what you’ll be getting if you buy an NFA PRO Gun Trust. The trust will be heavily redacted in order to prevent fraud or abuse, however.